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Trademarks

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City of Yellowknife Crest

Contacts

City of Yellowknife
General Inquiries
City Hall
4807 - 52 Street
P.O. Box 580
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2N4
Map this location
P: (867) 920-5600
F: (867) 920-5649
Email Us


1. Official City of Yellowknife Crest

City of Yellowknife Crest

The City of Yellowknife uses three versions of our crest. Please contact us at communications@yellowknife.ca or (867) 920-5600 to request any of the three versions for digital or print use.

 History of the Crest

The crest was designed by Netta Pringle, who was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1906, and lived in Yellowknife from 1954 to 1955. Netta is a graduate of Art Colleges in Liverpool and Edinburgh. While staying with friends in Toronto, Netta heard about a competition in Yellowknife for the City's Coat of Arms.

Gathering the vivid memories of her stay in Yellowknife, she assembled them into a crest symbolising the City. She used the Con mine headframe, a boat passing up the lake, miners' pick and shovel, maple leaf, northern lights, half-midnight sun, a yellow knife and wings, which, in her experience, was the only way of getting to Yellowknife. The Latin Moto "Multum in Parvo," which translates to "many things in a small place" was developed by Ted Horton (then Editor of News North) and a crest was born.

Netta was delighted to learn that she had won the contest and to receive her award of $25.00. When she returned to Yellowknife in 1956, she carved the shield on the biggest piece of wood available- a block of mahogany. Wood being at a high premium, she used a piece that had once been the backing for an advertisement board. Adding copper from one of her art classes and other finishes, she mounted it on a big sheet of plywood to make it more impressive. Netta was visited by an entourage of City officials who were interested in acquiring the wooden crest. She was astounded at their offer of $150.00 for the piece.

The carving of the crest also hangs in City Hall today. While Netta Pringle may never have expected it to endure, her design has withstood the times and changes Yellowknife has passed through and still represents "many things in a small place" for all who come to Yellowknife.

The City of Yellowknife thanks Judy McNicol for the donation of this original art work of the City's crest.

2. Diamond Capital of North America

Diamond Capital Crest
The City of Yellowknife officially registered the trademark Yellowknife - Diamond Capital of North Americaâ„¢ in 1999 to establish itself throughout the national and international diamond industry. 

The logo, which was designed to compliment the trademarked slogan, captures the energy and excitement that the new diamond industry has brought, not only to Yellowknife, but all across the Northwest Territories, Canada and North America. 

The BUILDINGS represent the future of Yellowknife as the centre of commercial and resource development activity for the Northwest Territories. 

The NORTHERN LIGHTS are a symbol of the strength, uniqueness and brilliance of the greatest natural show on earth. 

Finally, the DIAMOND represents the future prosperity of our city and our people.

3. Wildcat Cafe

Wildcat Cafe
The City of Yellowknife registered the trademark for Wildcat Café in 2011 to protect its interests.  As owner of the trademark, the City is responsible for ensuring its integrity is maintained.


Trademark information:
Trademark word: Wildcat Café

Services: 
Restaurant Services
Souvenir Store services relating to a variety of souvenirs, books, periodicals, snack foods and drinks.

What does a registered trademark mean? 
The registration provides proof of ownership.
It provides the City with exclusive rights across Canada for 15 years and may be renewed indefinitely.
It helps the City to protect products and services from imitation and misuse.
It allows the City to flag an infringement under the Trade-marks Act.
It provides the City with licensing opportunities to maximize our trademark's commercial potential.
It protects our trademark's value.

Using the City's Wildcat Café Trademark
Prior to using the Wildcat Café trademark please contact the City of Yellowknife for consideration and
(if required) approval. The City strives to ensure that the trademark is a replica with no additives, adjustments, associated wording or taglines.  There is no exclusive distributor of the Wildcat Café trademark at this time.  

If you are photographing or painting the Wildcat Café for personal use there is no prior permission required from the City of Yellowknife.

Want to learn more?
Visit Canadian Intellectual Property Office at www.cipo.ic.gc.ca

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